There is no shortage of artists producing very good work. I see lots of it every day. It takes more than just believing in yourself as an artist and creating good art to have an art business.

Artists who do not like to talk or write about their art insist that their work speaks for itself. If that were true, there would be no art critics, show catalogues or labels on museum walls.

Many artists would love to have their only job be to create works of art, so that they could be in the studio or outside most of the time. It is the reason we chose this profession. It is what feeds our souls, but it isn’t enough to feed our bank balances.

There is no such thing as one big break. This doesn’t happen in any profession, and art is no exception. All great achievements happen through many small acts, staged consistently over time.

Some artists think their art appeals to everyone because family and friends are always enthusiastic.

Any artist who wants a successful art business cannot afford to live only in the confines of a studio where making art is the only reality. If you just want to make art, and ignore the business side, then you must have other ways to support yourself.

Some artists mistakenly believe that their chosen vocation entitles them to be “free spirits.” Normal rules and schedules do not apply in their world. They do whatever they want, when they want and how they want.

“I often hear artists say that they are too right-brained to do left-brained business tasks. They imagine that getting a gallery means that they will be able to wash their hands of the filthy business side of art. They assume that the gallery will handle every aspect of marketing and selling their work.”

Artist Myth #2: Society Owes Artists a Living. Some artists feel that their contributions to society and culture merit more financial support.