Having great image files of your art is a bit of a no-brainer.

We need quality, clear, true to life images of our art that are an accurate representation of our artwork in real life.

This is the difference between a regular scan (left) and a scan that was edited for levels and saturation in Photoshop.

This is the difference between a regular scan (left) and a scan that was edited for levels and saturation in Photoshop. Click the photo for more info.

We’ve got a video course or a pdf to help you get your art web ready with the best results.

Once we’ve got fantastic images, we need to make the most of them to help us sell our art.

The easiest way to do this is to provide multiple views of your artwork:

  • multiple view points
  • detail view
  • in Situ (“in position / situation”) view


In Situ

The Beating Heart on the Wall
Stuck in CustomsArt Photos

This is by far the very best way for you to really sell your art.

You need to show art on your website, not only as an isolated image, but also as an integral part of an environment – in someone’s home, shop or where ever else you imagine your art is going to live with people.

You could ask friends and family to borrow their rooms (especially if they represent your target market) and use their beautiful homes to photograph your art in situ.

It’s really important that you nail the market though – don’t photograph your pop surrealism in your gramma’s “old english” tea room – even if it does have fantastic light.

We’re trying to help our potential buyer “see” our artwork on their wall – so we’re trying to find homes that, as much as possible, reflect the interiors of our target market.

You could offer a hanging service to your existing clients and hang and light your art for your customer. Then you can take beautiful photos of your art in actual target homes.

You could also just come right out an ask your existing collectors if any of them would be willing to open their homes for you to take pictures of your art In Situ.



In Use

Pure silk
modenadude /

Jewellery, scarves, books… any art / merchandise that is holdable or wearable must be photographed on the body &/or in the hand.

If you make cards or books – take pictures of your friends and families lounging with your book or opening your cards…

Whatever it is make sure it’s being shown IN USE.

Putting it in the hands of your models shows scale AND vicariously puts it into the hands of your buyers (which is 40% more likely to get the sale! – p.s. at the end of the month, I’m sending my mailing list a small lesson on tips to selling in real life. If you’d like to get in on that, join here).



Stock Photos

I use 3 services to look for photos when I need them:


Foter

I use Foter a LOT. Pretty much every photo on my blog that isn’t my own illustration is a free, royalty-free stock image I’ve found through Foter.

I use their wordpress plug-in. It aggregates all the free, royalty-free, creative commons, share-alike, creative commons licensed images on Flickr and image sharing sites and makes them searchable by key word.

Wikimedia works almost identically.

You need to be careful, because royalty-free doesn’t mean free for every application. Be careful if it’s got a non-commercial license attached. That means you can’t use that picture for ANYTHING relating to making money, maybe even a money-making blog.

Here’s a link to CreativeCommons.org and explains the differences between licenses.

Just be careful.

But take a look to search for environments or interiors you may want to use to display your art.

With the magic of photo-editing, you can stick your art anywhere you want for display.



iStock Photo

iStock Photo is a paid service, but because it’s paid, it’s going to give you the best possible images for your in situ image environments.

Here’s a collection of Gallery images I’ve saved on iStock:


iStock "Gallery Images" Lightbox

iStock “Gallery Images” Lightbox




You can purchase royalty-free images on iStock and then pop your own art on the walls and ta dah! Gallery environment in situ! Obviously, taking photos of your art while up at a show is ideal.

iStock has tonnes of interiors to search – living and dining rooms, hallways, kids rooms, patios, cafes… what ever kind of environment you think best suits your artwork, you can download and use as in situ display.



Word

A quick and dirty photo fix for your art can be done in Word.

Go to…

  • Insert > Picture > From File…
  • Choose the image file you want & click “Insert”
  • Make sure the image is selected and go to your “Formatting Palette” – it’s either in the toolbox on your desktop, or you can access it from the Toolbox on your menu in Word.
  • Go to “Quick Styles and Effects” and you can experiment with quick and easy drop shadows, glows and frames with your image. You can even angle your image so it will sit on an angled wall. Ta dah!



This is the plain jpg:

©LezleyDavidsonJoseph1616


These have been inserted into Word and been manipulated with Quick Styles & Effects in the Formatting Palette:

Screen Shot 2013-03-10 at 3.49.34 PM

Screen Shot 2013-03-10 at 3.49.57 PM

Screen Shot 2013-03-10 at 3.50.27 PM

Screen Shot 2013-03-10 at 3.51.39 PM



video course or the Essential Guide PDF.




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Discussion (2) ¬

    Make your photos work harder at selling your art!

    I put together my top 3 tips for how to leverage your art photos so they make your work really desirable!

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