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…and here we are.

My favourite arena of art.

Anything goes.

No snobbery or contempt at promotion and commercialization of art.

It’s art freedom.
 
 

Make Once, Sell Infinitely

Create your art once and then develop merch, licensing and print offerings to maximize your return on your art.

Make great stuff that people love and offer it to them in a variety of forms.

Some of this is covered in my free download “Revenue Stream Ideas for your Creative Biz”.
 
 



 
 
 
 

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Check out “The Academics” and the “Pretty Pictures” artists for more art biz and marketing ideas.

But writing is important. Writing is a bridge to your art. It’s a way for people to connect.

New York City is one of the most eclectic art scenes in the world for artists and visitors. Symbols of artistic recognition and fame include prominent museums, leading edge galleries, cutting edge artists, top art critics, and trade shows like Art Expo.

Avoid the artists who tells you that they’ve “done it” and “it doesn’t work.” These artists will tell you that they contacted the right people, sent out the correct material, created the work that the public wanted, and even after doing all of this, they still didn’t get anywhere.

There is no shortage of artists producing very good work. I see lots of it every day. It takes more than just believing in yourself as an artist and creating good art to have an art business.

Many artists would love to have their only job be to create works of art, so that they could be in the studio or outside most of the time. It is the reason we chose this profession. It is what feeds our souls, but it isn’t enough to feed our bank balances.

Some artists think their art appeals to everyone because family and friends are always enthusiastic.

Some artists mistakenly believe that their chosen vocation entitles them to be “free spirits.” Normal rules and schedules do not apply in their world. They do whatever they want, when they want and how they want.

“I often hear artists say that they are too right-brained to do left-brained business tasks. They imagine that getting a gallery means that they will be able to wash their hands of the filthy business side of art. They assume that the gallery will handle every aspect of marketing and selling their work.”